The Black Experience on America’s College Campuses

So far, we have raised $1,323 from 14 gifts towards our goal of $10,000.

The Black Experience on America’s College Campuses

Last summer, after the murder of George Floyd, racial and social injustice became a major international focus. Black stories were being told more than ever, and attention to issues of social injustice reached an all-time high. We want to keep telling these stories.

Newsrooms and media companies are predominantly white, and often Black journalists see others tell their stories — and they are stories Black journalists should have the platform to tell. That’s why there is no one better to tell stories of Black success on college campuses than young Black journalism students.

Two such students, the president and the secretary of the National Association of Black Journalists UT chapter, are working with Tyler Campbell, the son of legendary Longhorn Earl Campbell, to create a multi-episode podcast about the Black experience on America's college campuses.

The podcast will be produced by Moody College’s The Drag, an audio production house that created the international hit podcast “The Orange Tree.”

Listen to Tyler Campbell introduce David West and Faith Castle, the two students producing the podcast:

Possible episode topics

  • Racial overtones in campus traditions, i.e. “The Eyes of Texas” controversy
  • Black Homecoming
  • HBCU v PWIs
  • Percentage of Black students on campuses (only 5 percent of UT’s student population is Black)
  • Campus building names and statues 
  • Black student-athletes serve as minorities on college campuses but majorities within their respective sport

Budget

The Drag and NABJ are seeking $10,000 to begin work on the podcast. This would fund two student journalists to report, interview, record and edit the podcast. It would also fund Tyler Campbell, who has partnered with The Drag and NABJ on this project, as well as The Drag’s senior producer Katey Outka to oversee production and assist the students.

Budget breakdown: $10,000

  • Student journalist: $15 per hour, 12 hours a week for approximately 15 weeks: $2,700
  • Student journalist: $15 per hour, 12 hours a week for approximately 15 weeks: $2,700
  • Time for producer Tyler Campbell: $3,000
  • Time for senior producer Katey Outka: $1,600

Additional funding

With funding beyond the $10,000 we need to begin the project, we could produce more episodes and cover the cost of hardware and software for the students to produce a high-quality podcast.

  • Four additional episodes: $5,400
  • Shotgun microphone, lavalier mics and recorder: $2,300
  • Software needs, including Adobe Suite, music subscription for background/theme music and transcription software for interviews: $1,000

About The Drag

The Drag is an audio production house in the Moody College of Communication at UT Austin. The Drag hires students as part-time audio directors to write, edit, report and produce longform podcasts. The Drag’s first podcast, “The Orange Tree,” made it to the top 20 in all genres in Apple Podcasts. “Request Pending,” another Drag production, explores niche corners of the internet. The Drag is currently working on “Crooked Power,” which tells the story of an Ecuadorian newspaper (owned by the family of one of the podcast’s co-hosts) that has been the focus of an international controversy since 2011. Also coming soon from The Drag: “35,” a podcast about the communities and culture along Interstate 35 in Texas; “Story Submarine,” an immersive storytelling experience that brings children’s books to life; and a podcast about the deadly string of bombings that occured in Austin in 2018.

About NABJ

The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) offers innovative training, career advancement opportunities and advocacy initiatives for Black journalists and media professionals worldwide. UT’s chapter gives about 20 students a sense of community and belonging as members get an opportunity to receive advice and tips from industry professionals within the field of journalism. In our meetings, members discuss current events, internships, and potential upcoming projects. Most importantly, our meetings serve to keep members of the Black community connected while fostering an environment to network with other talented Black students. 

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